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Meet Dean Kokshun, the bookkeeping expert opening a new Rosemary Bookkeeping business in Croydon.

In need of a bookkeeper in Croydon?

Rosemary Bookkeeping has expanded its expert bookkeeping services into Croydon and the surrounding areas for the first time under the expert supervision of Dean Kokshun.

Dean’s expertise in bookkeeping is unparalleled.

He holds multiple prestigious qualifications and decades of experience supporting him in helping business owners with their bookkeeping needs.


Who is Dean Kokshun?

Dean’s journey in accountancy began in 1985.

This began with him joining the bookkeeping and external audit departments of KPMG Mauritius – then known as Peat Marwick.

He then qualified with the ACCA in the UK in 1993.

Dean was later admitted as a member in 1996 and achieved fellowship (FCCA) status in 2001.

As a qualified accountant, he has held senior positions within small UK accountancy practices, accumulating 30 years of experience.

Throughout his career, Dean has excelled in external auditing of small to medium-sized entities, financial reporting, and management reporting.

This has taken him across diverse industry sectors, including retail, services, manufacturing, hospitality, and investment.


Outside of his professional life, family caring duties and social commitments, Dean loves to relax and recharge by spending time out in nature.

Whether it is” a stroll in the local parks and gardens, exploring the countryside or enjoying the serenity of the coastline,” Dean has “a deep fascination with the beauty of the natural world and appreciates the simplicity and tranquillity that nature offers.”

“I also enjoy various individual and team sports, but if I must pick one which I practice the most, it has to be badminton,” he says.


Expertise

Dean’s extensive background and experience in accountancy have also provided him with a comprehensive understanding of the intricacies of financial reporting and external auditing.

Moreover, having worked with businesses in various sectors and clients in the UK and EU, he has developed a versatile skill set in navigating different accounting systems and processes.

His expertise in preparing financial statements following the UK GAAP and conducting external audits for small to medium-sized companies has equally equipped him with “a keen eye for detail and a commitment to compliance,” he says.

This experience has provided Dean insight and directly informs his approach to providing professional bookkeeping services for local businesses in Croydon and its surrounding areas.


Bookkeeping in Croydon

Drawing on his deep familiarity with the London Borough of Croydon, where he has lived since 1987, Dean is uniquely positioned to understand the local business landscape.

His decision to enter the bookkeeping industry stems from his passion for numbers and problem-solving.

“With 30 years of experience at the senior level in accountancy practices, I want to leverage my skills to provide essential financial services to businesses in my local area, Dean says.”

“The bookkeeping industry allows me to combine my expertise with the opportunity to support businesses in maintaining accurate financial records, ultimately contributing to their business success,” he adds.

“My commitment to delivering excellence in bookkeeping services aims to provide local businesses in Croydon and its surrounding areas with the support they need with their books and records.”


Furthermore, with the introduction of Making Tax Digital (MTD) for Income Tax by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) from 6 April 2026, bookkeepers will play a crucial role in helping businesses navigate the new system as they will be responsible for maintaining accurate and up-to-date financial records, ensuring that the data is entered correctly into the MTD-compliant software, and submitting quarterly updates to HMRC.

Dean’s clients in Croydon can expect a comprehensive range of bespoke bookkeeping services tailored to their unique needs.

These services include:

  • Accurate financial record-keeping
  • Meticulous attention to detail in all aspects of bookkeeping
  • Preparing and submitting VAT and CIS returns
  • Timely preparation of periodic and annual management reports
  • Coordinating with accountants and external auditors
  • Providing reports and information to prepare (and audit) year-end financial statements and tax returns
  • Provide support with their books and records and assist and ensure compliance with filing obligations with HM Revenue and Customs.

The beginning of a beautiful friendship

Dean says his adaptable nature and passion for learning have prepared him to embrace his new business.

“I believe that my strong work ethic, effective communication skills, and dedication to finding solutions to complex problems will contribute to the success of the venture, ensuring that clients receive high-quality and tailored bookkeeping services,” he says.

“I’m excited to bring this wealth of expertise to my franchise business, eager to provide top-notch bookkeeping services to the local businesses in Croydon and its surrounding areas, helping business owners with their books, saving them time and money and allowing them to focus on the things they do best – like running their businesses.”

Dean’s aspirations for his business align with the opportunities presented by Croydon’s strategic development plan.

As the area undergoes urban regeneration and economic growth, Dean promises to be a key player in supporting businesses to thrive amidst these positive changes.

In line with the Croydon Council’s four-year business plan, he envisions expanding his portfolio of clients and contributing to the economic opportunities flourishing in the area.

“My commitment is to stay attuned to the evolving needs of the local business community, providing exceptional bookkeeping services and contributing to the economic vibrancy of Croydon and its surrounding areas.”


Yasmin Chaudhari, Commercial Marketing Manager for ServiceMaster Brands UK, says,

“We’re so excited to have Dean join the Rosemary Bookkeeping network as we expand our services to the local businesses of Croydon and surrounding areas.”

“Dean joins us with a wealth of experience in finance, and we wish Dean all the best with his new venture with Rosemary Bookkeeping.”

“For businesses based within Croydon looking for smarter ways to manage their books, maximise their investments and get the support they need to scale up their businesses, it’s your lucky day!”


Need a bookkeeper?

If you’re in Croydon and the surrounding area and need support on your bookkeeping, contact Dean on 0208 191 2958.

Or, nationwide, find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business to see how we can help you today.

Important bookkeeping dates for your diary for August 2023.

August is a busy month for us bookkeepers, with deadlines abounding everywhere you look.

As a small business owner, you must navigate the next few weeks properly and ensure any payments and returns you must adhere to are in hand.

Here are the essential dates you might need in your diary for the coming month.

3rd August 2023

P46 Submission

This is the final day to submit P46 for employees whose car/fuel benefits changed during the quarter to 5 July 2023

7th August 2023

VAT Returns

VAT returns and payments are due for the Accounting Quarter period ending 30 June.

19th August 2023

Deadline

Deadline for postal PAYE, NICs and CIS payment to HMRC.

22nd August 2023

Deadline

Deadline for electronic remittance of PAYE, NICs and CIS to HMRC.

30th August 2023

Deadline

Deadline for filing of accounts with Companies House for accounting

August 30th, 2023

Tax Return

Corporation Tax returns are due for accounting periods ending 31st August 2022.

30th August 2023

Tax Return

The Corporation tax return is due for payment for accounting periods ending 30th November 2022.

Need help with your bookkeeping?

If this seems like a lot of work to remember, leave your bookkeeping to the professionals.

Entrusting your bookkeeping to Rosemary means:

  • We keep track of your deadlines for you
  • We know when your Tax return needs to be filed by
  • We can keep track of your CIS payments

To learn more about our services and how Rosemary Bookkeeping can help you, find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeper or call 0345 862 0072 today.

What is tax payment interest and how has it changed?

With March in full swing, two changes are in effect surrounding the interest of tax repayment.

Tax interest rates, enforced by HMRC, are set in legislation and linked to the Bank of England base rates.

There are two rates:
  1. Late payment interest
  2. Repayment interest

Why are late payments and repayments different?

These two rates are separate to remain in line with the policy of other tax authorities worldwide.

According to HMRC, it compares favourably with the commercial practice for interest charged on loans or overdrafts and interest paid on deposits.

What are the changes to tax payment interest?

In early February, the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee met and voted to raise interest rates to 4%.

A move which they hope will tackle rising inflation pressures.

This is the tenth vote following which the committee has increased interest rates.

The changes, enacted on 13th February for quarterly instalment payments and 21st February for non-quarterly instalments payments, make rates their highest since November 2008.

This means the late payment interest rate applied to the taxes HMRC charges interest on increases to 6.50%. An increase of 0.5%.

Meanwhile, the repayment interest rates increased by 0.5% to 3%.

This repayment rate is set at the Bank Rate minus 1%, with a 0.5% lower limit.

What is the lower limit?

According to HMRC, the lower limit for repayment interest ensures taxpayers still get 0.5%, even when the base rate fell to 0.1%.

Repayment interest will be paid at 0.5% until the Bank of England raises the base rate above 1.5%. It will then increase with the base rate.

Late payment has been set at base rate plus 2.5%

Need help managing the numbers?

With rates changing all the time, it can be hard to keep track.

At Rosemary Bookkeeping, we are on top of all current legislation and are experts in ensuring you know which way is up regarding your business financials.

By contacting your local expert, you benefit from regular advice on the latest tax changes.

As well as bespoke and professional management of your bookkeeping needs.

Know what tax rates are and how to avoid them, trust your local expert.

To see how outsourcing your books to your friendly local bookkeeping service could help you, find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business or call 0345 862 0072 today.

With just over a month left to pay your self-assessment tax bill, here’s everything you need to know to get it sorted ASAP.

Self-Assessments are used by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to collect Income Tax.

For most, this is deducted automatically from wages, pensions and savings. But people and businesses with other income must report said income in a tax return. This includes COVID-19 grants and support payments.

How do I know if I need to file a tax return?

By now, no matter the size of your business, you should have registered for your tax return self-assessment, if during the last tax year (6th April 2021 to 5th April 2022) you were self-employed as a sole trader that earned more than £1,000 (before subtracting tax-relief deductions) or if you were a partner in a business partnership.

If you’re unsure of whether this applies to you, HMRC provides a self-assessment eligibility calculator, so that you can see if you need to file a tax return for 2021-2022.

Why do I have to pay?

Tax returns are not voluntary, and have to be completed no matter what.

As a new business and did not send an online return last year, allow extra time (up to 20 working days) as you’ll need to register first.

You’ll need to register through the HMRC website, but there are different ways to register if you’re:

Staying ahead

It makes much more sense to stay on top of these things as they go, so even if you don’t need to submit or pay for the last tax year, it makes sense to get registered now so you are prepared for next year.

Furthermore, you should keep records as current as you can. For self-employed business owners especially, if your books are up to date, you will have a better understanding of the financial standing of your business.

This means you will be able to put money away for the self-assessment at the end of the year.

‘Payments on Account’:

There is also usually a following secondary payment on 31st July to make advanced payments. These are known more commonly as ‘Payments on Account’, which are advance payments towards your tax bill that are made twice a year. Usually on 31st January and 31st July.

What are the deadlines I need to know?

The deadline to register for the last tax year passed on 5th October 2022, and paper tax returns should have been submitted by 31st October 2022.

However, if you haven’t done so already, you can still submit your tax return online and pay the tax you owe to HMRC, as the deadline for both of these requirements is midnight on the 31st of January 2023.

Instances in which the deadline is different:
  • HMRC may have written to you to give different deadlines. In this case, your assigned deadline applies.
  • If you are eligible, you may have submitted your return in time for 30th December 2022.

In such cases, HMRC will automatically collect tax from your wages and pension and must receive a paper tax return by 31st January 2023 if you are a trustee of a registered pension scheme or a non-resident company.

Please note that in this case, you cannot send a return online.

  • If your partnership’s accounting date is between 1st February and 5th April and one of your partners is a limited company, the deadline for returns is different.

Online: 12 months from the accounting date.

Paper: 9 months from the accounting date.

Late payment penalties

Perhaps the most obvious reason to stay on top of this process, is that there are fines for lack of payment.

If your tax return is up to three months late, you will have to pay a late filing penalty of £100. If it is later, or you pay your tax bill late, you will have to pay more and will be charged further interest on late payments.

This amount can be estimated on the HMRC website.

You can appeal these penalties if you have a reasonable excuse such as:

  • The death of a partner or close relative – provided this was shortly before the tax return or payment deadline.
  • Fire, flood or theft that prevented you from making the deadline.
  • Serious or life-threatening illness.
  • Postal delays that you could not have predicted.
  • Computer software failure just before the preparation of your online return.

It’s better to make your payments whilst you have time, rather than suddenly come to find you have to shell out even more for overdue tax returns in the new year.

How Rosemary Bookkeeping can help

There’s a lot to account for when figuring out your tax return payments, and not much time left to sort it before the new year. Your friendly, local Rosemary Bookkeeper can help.

Outsourcing your books to Rosemary means:
  • You receive expert help and support properly and promptly pay your tax return for January 2023
  • Your books are done regularly. So, you can see what is going on in your business
  • You don’t have to spend your valuable time doing the books, so you can do things more beneficial to your financial income
  • No additional staff. You only pay for the work done
  • You don’t have to do a job you loath

Want help with your January self-assessment tax return?

Leaving your assessment to Rosemary leaves you with a clear mind and the space to spend your holidays free of worry, and get on with doing the business you love.

If you think it’s time to outsource your bookkeeping, find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business to see how we can help you today.

You can’t leave it all to tech.

Bookkeeping is tricky. Especially for small businesses, when you are juggling a million other things. So, it’s understandable that you want to ease the burden of this task any way you can. Nowadays we can turn to technology to solve most of our problems, and bookkeeping is no exception. You may have even seen adverts praising digital bookkeeping aids. Popular software like Xero and Quickbooks promise to make bookkeeping easy, help you track and manage expenses and stay on top of taxes. But how true is this?

What bookkeeping software does

Quickbooks promises three major things:

  • The ability to stay on top of taxes
  • The ability to track and manage expenses
  • Keeping data that allows for ‘no-nonsense’ payroll

This technology is all designed around one central premise: streamlining your bookkeeping experience. Everything bookkeeping software do is about using technology to save you time.

The bottom line is, using online software depends on you. Your ability to use this software depends on how much you know about bookkeeping and how up to date you are with recent legislative changes etc. For example, Quickbooks and Xero both rely on the use of VAT codes. But they do not provide support on what these are, and how to use them. For all their data and efficiency, they do not help much if you don’t know a lot about bookkeeping. As a result, relying on this software means taking a big risk depending on how much you know. If you are not confident with your books, you would still be better off using a bookkeeper.

What a bookkeeper does better

Having a personal bookkeeper involves all the benefits of bookkeeping software and more. They help you keep on top of your VAT returns, payroll and tax obligations. A bookkeeper also helps you track and manage your expenses, produces debtor and creditor reports to help with your cash flow and daily management of your business. They provide you with industry-specific knowledge and help you make more educated business decisions. This means you receive support all year round with any bookkeeping queries you might have. With a bookkeeper, you are not reliant on technology. QuickBooks and Xero are fantastic tools that can automate a big part of the bookkeeping process, but when it comes to technology, errors made by automated systems cannot be avoided and need somebody with experience and knowledge to check if the entries and codes are correct. Using a bookkeeper allows you not to be reliant on the software and automatic data entry. A bookkeeper also assures that your business is compliant, you meet all the deadlines, and your information is archived properly. Thanks to this you can avoid costly mistakes, save time and money. knowing that your business finances are in good hands.

For a reliable and professional bookkeeping service, contact your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business today.

With 2022 now underway, here is your reminder of some important dates for the rest of this financial year.

January 2022:

January has various important dates to remember.

There are two different monthly deadlines for sending off your payments for CIS, NICs and PAYE to HMRC. The postal deadline is 19th January, and the deadline for electronic payments is 22nd January. These payment dates for CIS, NICs, and PAYE then repeat monthly for the remainder of this financial year.

31st January is an important date to remember for various reasons. It is the deadline for filing your Self-Assessment tax return form for the tax year that ended in April 2021. However, due to the difficulties may have faced as a result of COVID-19, HMRC has waived late fee filing penalties for Self-Assessment Tax Returns.

If you have been unable to file your return by the 31st January deadline you will not receive a fine, permitting that you file online by 28th February. Anyone who cannot pay their Self-Assessment tax by the 31st January deadline will not receive a late payment penalty if they pay tax in full, or set up a Time to Pay arrangement by 1st April. However, interest will be payable from 1st February as usual, so it is still better to pay on time where possible.

January 31st is also the deadline by which you need to have filed your 2020/21 Capital Gains Tax, and if your company has a January 2021 year-end, you will also need to have filed your Corporation Tax by this date. Furthermore, the 31st is the date by which you need to have finalised the balancing payment of tax for 2019-2020, and the first payment of Account for Income Tax for 2021-2022.

February 2022:

The first date to remember in this month is 1st February, as it is the due date for paying Corporation Tax for the period that ended 30th April 2021.

If your business uses vehicles, the deadline for submitting Car P46 for the financial quarter ending 5th January 2022 is 2nd February. Following this, the VAT Tax Return and payments deadline for the accounting quarter period ending 31st December 2021 is 7th February. As with January, the monthly postal and electronic deadlines for the payment of CIS, NICs, and PAYE to HMRC are the 19th and 22nd respectively.

Finally, the due date to file for Corporation Tax for companies with a 28th February 2021 year-end is 28th February. Remember this is also now the final date you can now file your Jan Self-Assessment tax return online without receiving a fine.

March 2022:

1st March is both the new AFR (Advisory Fuel Rates) day for company car users and the due date for the payment of Corporation Tax for the period that ended 31st May 2021.

The 7th of March is the deadline for VAT Returns and payments of the accounting quarter that ended on 31st January 2022. For large companies with the year-end of 31st March 2022 and 31st December 2022, the due date for Corporation Tax quarterly instalments is 14th March.

Following this are the monthly postal and electronic deadlines for the payment of CIS, NICs, and PAYE on the 19th and 22nd of March. The filing date for companies with 31st March 2021 as a year-end round off the month on 31st March.

April 2022:

April is the end of the current 2021/2022 financial year. It begins with the due date for payment of Corporation Tax (for the period that ended 30th June 2021) on the 1st of April.

Then, the current tax year ends on the 5th of April, and the 2022/2023 tax year begins the following day on the 6th of April. Also on the 6th, IR35 comes into force in the private sector.

19th April is a busy day this year. Firstly, automatic interest is charged where PAYE Tax, Class 1 NI, CIS and/or Student Loans are not paid by this date, so make sure you have these paid up to date well in advance. Furthermore, PAYE quarterly payments are also due for small employers for periods 6th January 2021 – 5th April 2021.

19th April is also the deadline for employers’ final PAYE return to be submitted online for 2020/2021.

Finally, on 30th April, corporation Tax Returns need to be filed by companies with 30th April 2021 as a year-end.

Need help with your bookkeeping?

That’s all for the current tax year in 2022.

If all of this seems like a lot of work to remember, you can leave your bookkeeping to the professionals by letting us handle your books for you.

Entrusting your bookkeeping to Rosemary means:

· We keep track of your deadlines for you

· We know when your Tax return needs to be filed by

· We can keep track of your CIS payments

To find out more about our services and find out how Rosemary Bookkeeping can help you, call 0345 862 0072, or find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeper today.

We’ve made a list of festive expenses that you may be able to claim back as a business expense.

Christmas time can be a busy and expensive time for many businesses – big or small. But with the January Self-Assessment Tax Return coming up, here are some festive expenses that you might not have thought about reclaiming.

Decking the Halls

If ‘business as usual’ has resumed in your office, then you may have decided to also carry on the festive tradition of decorating your office for the holidays. What you might not be aware of, is that you can actually claim back decorations like a Christmas tree, tinsel, and wreathes as tax by logging them on your accounts as running costs for the office. Bear in mind that this doesn’t extend to employees working from home however, as HMRC judges this as personal enjoyment, not office related.

A Christmas Party

Providing that you went ahead with a Christmas do this year, be it virtual or in person, you may be liable to claim expenses back as tax. However, this depends on who was in attendance.

If the event is/was open to all of your employees, then the whole thing will be taxable, no matter the number of people in your operation. However, you cannot claim expenses if there were also clients and/or associates in attendance, as this is not acceptable for corporation tax or VAT purposes as HMRC classes this as business entertaining. Furthermore, any even that is not open to all employees will also not be liable.

As a result – if you do decide to invite clients and/or associates to a Christmas event, remember to allocate sufficient funds to cover their expenses because you won’t be able to claim any tax relief, or reclaim any VAT on costs. Bear in mind that you should still record this in your books, and add the costs back on when you come to calculate your profit for tax.

Presents

As it is Christmas, you may choose to buy gifts for staff or clients. In the case of clients, you are able to record these as a business cost on your books, provided that these gifts meet the appropriate guidelines so as not to constitute potential bribery. This means:

  • You must not spend more than £50 (p.a.) on gifts for any one client.
  • You must not gift a client an item that can be exchanged for goods or money – such as cash or vouchers.
  • You must include a conspicuous advert for your business. For more information regarding gifts to clients, please visit the HMRC website.

In the case of your staff, there are other key tax considerations regarding gifts:

  • If the gift has no cash benefit, then it may be accepted by HMRC as trivial benefit, which means that you will not need to pay extra tax or National Insurance, or report it on the employee’s P11D form.
  • If your gift does include cash payment to staff – they will be classified in the same way as regular earnings by HMRC so should be put through payroll as normal – and might require a National Insurance payment.

More guidance and information on gifts for staff can be found on the HMRC website.

If navigating this all feels a little daunting, why not entrust your bookkeeping to the professionals? You can find more information on the upcoming January tax return here, and to find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business, click here.

Inflation rates are projected to reach highs of 4% before the end of this year. This could have a big impact if you own and run a small business. Here’s what you need to know:

British inflation has hit decade highs, caused by a combination of factors including COVID-19, Brexit, rising energy and fuel prices, higher costs of raw materials and goods in factories, and higher bills in restaurants and hotels. In October, the UK Office for National Statistics reported that inflation had hit 4.2%, a 1.1% increase from September – a significantly bigger increase than had been predicted by experts.

So what does this mean for small business owners?

Well, this could have a number of knock-on effects that small business owners should be aware of, including:

  • A rising in costs of labour to compensate for increasing inflation
  • Rising costs of products and services
  • Labour shortages and supply chain issues

This will only be exacerbated by The Bank of England’s inconsistency on the topic of interest rate rises. As this is the mechanism used to control inflation, this will make more money more expensive to borrow – which would further reduce demand. This, in tandem with a fixed supply, means that price increases slow down, and businesses are faced with decision of whether or not to lower prices in order to maintain sales, or raise them to maintain profit (and risk losing customers).

So what can you do?

Unfortunately, the current situation leaves businesses with a dilemma and a bit of a no-win scenario. This will only change when either demand reduces or supply chains resume normal service. Meaning that, at present, the solution is in finding a balance between increasing costs and maintaining profits.

If you find the prospect of managing your finances in this difficult time daunting, why not contact Rosemary Bookkeeping? We can take care of your books for you and help you manage your finances. Hiring a professional bookkeeping service like Rosemary can greatly benefit you as we are able to help with tracking the cost and profit in your business.

Outsourcing your books to Rosemary also means:

  • Your books are done regularly – so you can see what is going on in your business
  • You don’t have to spend your valuable time doing the books – so you can do things more beneficial to your financial income
  • Paying less than you would for an accountant
  • You don’t need to hire any additional staff. You only pay for the work done
  • You don’t have to do a job you loath

To outsource your books today, and receive financial advice from our experts, give us a call on 0345 862 0072, or find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeping business here.

If you own a small business and are approaching the holidays worrying how you’re going to manage your books, why not make these tips part of your New Year’s resolution?

The prospect of maintaining your books can be a daunting one for many small business owners. Juggling a steadily growing pile of receipts and invoices can certainly start to feel like quite the balancing act. But not to worry, we are here to help alleviate any anxiety about managing your books. Simply follow these tips to stay on top of your finances:

  1. Keep personal and business finances separate

Have separate bank accounts when you are running your own business, by separating out the two, you will be able to avoid any messy mix-ups in your finances.

  1. Don’t get rid of receipts and invoices

In a small business, nothing should go to waste. Make sure that you and your staff receipts and/or invoices for any and all expenditure, and attach them to expenses claims. To be safe, keep all records for at least six years.

  1. Maintain filing system

These records should be simple and easily organised. Sales invoices should be raised and filed in order, and purchases should follow a system that is logical to you.

  1. Keep your time similarly organised

Working closely with a plan or schedule can help you to best stay on top of your finances. Allotting diarised time to reconcile your bank accounts or update records will mean that it becomes part of your routine, and this can help it to feel like less of a chore. It also means that it doesn’t become forgotten amongst all of the other things you have to do.

Be sure to raise sales invoices quickly and file your paperwork on time. You may be able to remember what happened last week, but not last month or the month before.

  1. Stay on track of petty cash

In the same vain, you should be keeping receipts for your petty cash, and reconciling amounts regularly.  Keeping a keen eye on your cash will help to reduce the risk of loss or theft.

  1. Bank payments quickly

Once you have these cash or cheque payments it is important to stay on top of them and get them in the bank fast – even if they might feel old school. By doing this, you will reduce the risk of losing them or spending them quickly. Plus, the quicker they are in the bank, the better your cash flow.

  1. Chasing debtors

Slow payers can cause real harm to your business, and damage your cash flow. Set a clear policy for chasing up debtors. You aren’t loaning money, so your clients need to pay.

  1. Plan ahead by putting money aside

Putting money aside, perhaps in another account, will mean there are extra funds available in the event that you need them. There will always be future expenditures, such as VAT, so be sure to be prepared by planning ahead.

  1. Learn the basics

It’s true that you should always have a professional handle your finances for you, but knowing the basics can help you a lot from day to day. If you would like to learn more about finances and bookkeeping, you can find a lot of useful information and tips on our news page – under the bookkeeping tab.

  1. Trust the professionals

The best way to manage your finances is to enlist the help of a professional. Managing your books can be difficult, especially when trying to manage it alongside everything else you need to do as a small business. Outsourcing your bookkeeping to Rosemary means that your books are maintained regularly, but you don’t have to spend your valuable time doing them yourself. You also won’t need to hire any additional staff – you only pay for the work done – and a bookkeeper is cheaper than an accountant!

If you think it’s time to outsource your bookkeeping, get in touch with Rosemary Bookkeeping, or find your nearest branch here.

The Holiday season approaches – a very busy time for most businesses. Whilst it may be easy to get carried away with festivities or Christmas rushes, don’t forget that you can carry out your self-assessment months in advance.

By now, whether you are self-employed, a partnership, or neither, you should have registered for your tax return self-assessment. The deadline for the assessment may be the end of January next year, but we are just about to head into a very busy period for most businesses, and that time will be gone in a flash. So, it’s well worth getting a head-start on the process now.

‘But I simply don’t have time!’ you say. This winter period is a busy one for businesses the world over, so the temptation to put off that January tax return is a strong and understandable one. Unfortunately, it is not an option. Tax returns are not voluntary, and have to be completed no matter what. Luckily there is still plenty of time before that rush period really starts, so you still have the option to get it done now, early doors. Plus, it makes much more sense to stay on top of these things as they go, and keep your records as current as you can. For self-employed business owners especially, if your books are up to date, you will have a better understanding of the financial standing of your business. This means you will be able to put money away for the self-assessment at the end of the year.

There are instances in which the deadline is different:

  • If you are eligible, you can submit your online return by 30th December 2021, provided you want HMRC to automatically collect tax from your wages and pension.

In this case, HMRC must receive a paper tax return by 31st January 2022 if you are a trustee of a registered pension scheme or a non-resident company. Please note that in this case, you cannot send a return online.

HMRC may also write or email to give you a different deadline. More details can be found on their website.

  • Partnership returns if you have a company as a partner.

If your partnership’s accounting date is between 1st February and 5th April and one of your partner’s is a limited company, the deadline for returns is different.

Online: 12 months from the accounting date.

Paper: 9 months from the accounting date.

Late payment penalties:

Perhaps the most obvious reason to stay on top of this process, is that there are fines for lack of payment. If your tax return is up to three months late, you will have to pay a late filing penalty of £100. If it is later, or you pay your tax bill late, you will have to pay more and will be charged further interest on late payments. This amount can be estimated on the HMRC website.

You can appeal these penalties if you have a reasonable excuse such as:

  • The death of a partner or close relative – provided this was shortly before the tax return or payment deadline.
  • Fire, flood or theft that has prevented you from making the deadline.
  • Serious or life-threatening illness.
  • Postal delays that you could not have predicted.
  • Computer software failure just before the preparation of your online return.

But for the sake of tardiness, these fines are not worth the risk. It would be better to make sure of your payments whilst you have time, rather than suddenly come to find you have to shell out even more for overdue tax returns in the new year.

And if absolutely none of this has convinced you that it’s best to pay early, and the idea of sorting out your own tax returns this Christmas makes you say ‘Bah Humbug’, then don’t worry. We’ll do it for you!

Outsourcing your books to Rosemary means:

  • Your books are done regularly (so you can see what is going on in your business)
  • You don’t have to spend your valuable time doing the books (so you can do things more beneficial to your financial income)
  • A bookkeeper is cheaper than an accountant (who doesn’t like to be cost-effective?)
  • Outsourcing means no additional staff (you only pay for the work done)
  • You don’t have to do a job you loath

 

Leaving your assessment to Rosemary leaves you with a clear mind and the space to spend your holidays free of worry, and getting on with doing business you love.

If you think it’s time to outsource your bookkeeping, get in touch with Rosemary Bookkeeping, it’s what we do best.

From 1 October 2021, a new reduced interim VAT rate of 12.5% will be introduced for hospitality, holiday accommodation/attractions and it will stay in place until 31 March 2022. It replaces the current temporary reduced rate of 5% for these sectors.

This reduction in VAT is intended to boost trade immediately for hotels, B&B’s, cafes, pubs, restaurants, cinemas, zoos and theme parks to name but a few.

The reduced rate of VAT will apply to:

  • Hot/cold food and non-alcoholic beverages for consumption on the business premises, for example, cafes, restaurants and pubs. Cold takeaway food continues to be subject to VAT at 20% or 0% under the existing rules.
  • Hot takeaway food and hot takeaway non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Sleeping accommodation such as hotels and similar establishments, holiday accommodation, caravan and tent pitch fees and associated families
  • Admissions to theatres, shows, fairs, concerts, museums, zoos, cinemas, exhibitions and similar cultural events and facilities. If a business charges admission fees that are currently exempt then that will take precedence and the admission will not qualify for the reduced rate. The reduced rate does not apply to admission to sporting events.

From 1 October 2021, all eligible businesses should apply the interim VAT rate of 12.5% on takings of supplies made of the goods and services listed above and on issued invoices until 31 March 2022.

Care will need to be taken where goods and services were supplied prior to 1 October 2021 but invoiced after 1 October 2021, and vice versa.

For example, in some circumstances, if a business has received a payment or deposit before 15 July 2020 but supplies the goods or services after 15 July 2020, then the business can choose to charge and account for VAT at 5% by issuing a credit note within 45 days of the rate change.

Flat Rate Scheme Changes
HMRC have updated the flat rate percentages to take account of the new reduced rate for VAT.
As of 15 July 2020 until 30 September 2021 the following sector rates apply:

  • Catering 4.5% (reduced from 12.5%)
  • Hotels 0% (reduced from 10.5%)
  • Pubs 1% (reduced from 6.5%)

From 1 October 2021 until 31 March 2022 the following sector rates apply:

  • Catering 8.5% (interim VAT rate)
  • Hotels 5.5% (interim VAT rate)
  • Pubs 4% (interim VAT rate)

Businesses that operate outside of the hospitality, holiday accommodation and attraction sectors may also be impacted by the VAT rate change if they make purchases from these sectors.

You’ll be able to apply the new VAT code in QuickBooks, Xero and other software after 1st October 2021.

Further detailed guidance can be found on the gov.uk websites HERE and HERE.

Are you unsure of what you can reclaim VAT on? Here we’ve explained what you can and cannot reclaim any VAT on:

As a business, you can usually claim back any VAT you have paid on goods and services bought for business use, for which you have a valid VAT receipt. Remember, no receipt, no reclaim!

If the item you buy is also for personal use, you can only claim back a proportion of the VAT paid, only the actual business element of this item, mobile phone bills are a good example. You might use your mobile 60% for work and 40% for personal, in which case you can only claim back the VAT on the 60% of the purchase price and plan. You need to ensure that you have adequate records to support your VAT reclaim which shows how you calculated the business use percentage.

It’s usually a good idea to have separate phone bills for personal and business use, this way it’s easier when claiming back any VAT.

A Valid VAT Receipt

A valid VAT receipt includes the following:

  • Name, Address and VAT number of the supplier
  • Your name and address
  • The date
  • A description of the goods or services
  • The cost before VAT
  • The separate VAT amount
  • The total amount that contains the VAT.

Having said that, many VAT receipts are actually a shorter version, simply containing the total amount paid, the seller’s name and VAT number. To work out any VAT quickly this website is very helpful – http://www.vatcalculator.co.uk/ . This is the amount you can reclaim.

Can you claim the VAT back on items brought in the EU?

Do you buy goods from the EU?

You can’t claim for goods bought in EU countries, although you may be able to reclaim VAT paid via the electronic cross-border refund system. You can reclaim VAT on products and services bought during the refund period, plus VAT on goods imported to Britain during the same timescale.

You can’t claim for VAT that has been invoiced incorrectly, where VAT has been levied on sending goods to another member state or exported items outside the EU.

Things you cannot reclaim VAT for

You can’t reclaim VAT on insurance, salaries, PAYE, postage, bank interest or business entertainment. However, VAT on entertainment for overseas customers can on occasions be reclaimed when that entertainment is very basic.

You can’t claim for anything you’ve bought specifically for personal use, or the products and services your business uses from VAT-exempt supplies. Also items you buy under VAT second-hand margin schemes and business assets transferred to you as a going concern are also exempt from VAT reclaim.

Not registered for VAT?

When your business isn’t registered for VAT, you don’t have to charge VAT to your customers, however, you also can’t claim any VAT back. That’s why so many smaller businesses try to stay under the VAT radar, under the registration limit (the current threshold is £83,000 – see https://www.gov.uk/vat-registration/when-to-register for further details) . Charging VAT to a customer who isn’t registered for VAT means they’ll have to cover this cost as well.

What about VAT post-Brexit?

Domestic VAT rules remain the same following the end of the Brexit transition period, however, VAT rules relating to imports and exports have changed.

Prior to Brexit and during the transition period, the UK was part of a regime called the EU VAT Regime, which meant that a UK business didn’t have to register for VAT in each EU country. Now though, as of 1st January 2021 Great Britain now has to treat EU countries like they do countries outside of the EU.

It can get very confusing so we’d suggest taking a look at this article by Sage explaining this in a bit more detail.

Do you need support with the VAT system?

If you need VAT support, we’re here to help, find your nearest Rosemary Bookkeeper today.

The UK exited the EU VAT regime, Customs Union and Single Market from 1 January 2021. This means the loss of a range of compliance simplifications and the imposition of customs declarations, goods regulations, services and import VAT.

In this article HERE you can find an outline of the major changes affecting VAT treatment after the UK leaving the EU.

Here you can find the most recent guidance from the government; Import goods into the UK: step by step

If you import goods into Great Britain from outside the UK or from outside the EU to Northern Ireland you may have to pay import VAT on goods. For supplies of services from outside the UK you must account for VAT under the reverse charge procedure.

Guidance on Paying VAT on imports from outside the UK to Great Britain and from outside the EU to Northern Ireland

Export goods from the UK: step by step
Guidance on how and when you can apply zero-rated VAT to exported goods – Goods exported from the UK from 1 January 2021

TOMS – Tour Operators Margin Scheme 

If you supply digital services to private consumers you can read the guidance here – VAT rules for supplies of digital services to consumers 

CIS VAT changes

If you’re in the construction sector changes on VAT are coming on 1st March 2021.

VAT reverse charge technical guide HERE.

VAT is due when a VAT invoice is issued, or payment is received, whichever is earlier.

For invoices issued for specified supplies that become liable to the reverse charge, the VAT treatment for invoices with a tax point:

  • before 1 March 2021 – the normal VAT rules will apply and you should charge VAT at the appropriate rate on your supplies
  • on or after 1 March 2021 – the domestic reverse charge will apply